Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Stem Cell & PRP

by


MeMedical Director at Advance Spine Care and Pain Management


Stem cells research falls in the field of regenerative medicine. The field itself is undergoing active research worldwide and rapidly advancing.


More: http://www.kevinlimd.com/stem-cell-prp/


https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/stem-cell-prp-kevin-li-md-qme-ime-9?trk=hp-feed-article-title-like

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Rested and wrinkled? Oh, the irony

Are the facial wrinkles, lines and folds that happen with aging result purely from the expressions we make? While skin distortion from facial expressions causes many, if not most, of the wrinkles we see on our faces with age, a new study suggests there’s a wrinkle (ahem) in that line of thinking. It turns out, as many experts in facial aesthetics have long assumed, wrinkles also result from "mechanical distortion" during sleep.

Plastic surgeon and lead author Goesel Anson, M.D., clinical instructor of surgery at the School of Medicine, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and colleagues report in the study published online June 21 in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal that compression, shear and stress force factors result in facial distortion when people sleep on their sides and stomach.
These sleep wrinkles tend to be perpendicular to expression lines and they don’t respond significantly to animation, according to Dr. Anson. Common sleep wrinkles include the lateral oblique forehead crease, radial orbital crease, lateral (vertical) malar crease, medial cheek crease, nasal/lip crease, corner lip crease, oblique marionette crease, preauricular crease and inferior vertical cheek crease, according to the study.

American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery President Daniel C. Mills, M.D., a plastic surgeon in Laguna Beach, Calif., says he has long suggested to patients that some of their facial wrinkles come from sleep positions, especially when patients complain that they have more wrinkles on one side of the face than the other. He’ll ask them how they sleep at night, and often the light goes off in the patient’s mind that, yes, those wrinkles show up on the side of their favorite sleeping position, he says.
“So, these are things that we see on a daily basis, but it’s very nice for the doctors to have written an article about this, quantifying it,” Dr. Mills says.
The researchers not only looked at wrinkles from sleep, but also potential facial skin expansion. Based on available studies, they didn’t find a direct correlation between facial distortion during sleep and skin expansion, Dr. Anson says. However, it’s a logical conclusion to draw from basic science literature and more research needs to be done on the subject matter, she says.

Monday, August 15, 2016

Sleep-induced wrinkles resist treatment


People who sleep on their side or stomach exert compression, shear and stress force factors on their faces that result in distortion and, ultimately, wrinkles, according to a study published in the Aesthetic Surgery Journal. Fillers and neuromodulators are ineffective or short-lived in sleep-induced wrinkles, says study leader and plastic surgeon Goesel Anson, but radiofrequency and ultrasound devices or microneedling might be options, according to American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery President Daniel Mills.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Dr. Patrick J. Treacy

We have all seen individuals whose mood has changed positively following BTX-A injection in the brow area. Now there is growing evidence that treatment of the glabellar area may actually be used to treat depression. In this paper Dr. Patrick Treacy looks at the current data to support this theory.
Depression affects over 120 million people globally, making it one of the leading causes of disability in the world. Although there are various effective treatments, therapeutic response remains unsatisfactory and depression can develop as a chronic condition in a considerable proportion of patients. Negative emotions, such as anger, fear, and sadness are prevalent in depression and also are associated with hyperactivity of the corrugator and procerus muscles in the glabellar region of the face. In 1872, Charles Darwin recognised these features as a very specific expression of sadness and attributed them to the activity of so-called ‘grief muscles’ in the glabellar region. He also formulated a new theory called the ‘facial feedback hypothesis’, which implied a mutual interaction between emotions and facial muscle activity. More recently, Larsen et al. have shown experimental evidence that voluntary contraction of facial muscles can channel emotions, which are conversely expressed by activation of these muscles.
Heckmann and others (1992) have published data suggesting that treatment of the glabellar region with botulinum toxin produces a change in facial expression from angry, sad, and fearful to happy and this can impact on emotional experience. Many therapists, including Sommer (2003) have shown that patients who have been treated in the glabellar area reported an increase in emotional wellbeing and reduced levels of fear and sadness beyond what would be expected from the cosmetic benefit alone. Hennenlotter (2009) went one stage further and showed that botulinum toxin treatment to the glabellar area stopped the activation of limbic brain regions normally seen during voluntary contraction of the corrugator and procerus muscles. This indicated that feedback from the facial musculature in this region in some way modulated the processing of emotions. Many other researchers have continued down this road with Havas (2010) noting that the processing time for sentences with negative affective connotation was prolonged in women after glabellar botulinum toxin treatment and Neal and Chartrand (2011) speculating that the treatment interfered with the ability to decode the facial expression of other people. This is where things were until recently with many authors suggesting that this capacity to counteract negative emotions could be put to some clinical use during the treatment of depression.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140608174205-31515886-botox-and-depression

Monday, August 8, 2016

Ailesbury SMART® Hair Transplant technique Dr. Patrick J. Treacy, Medical Director of Ailesbury Clinics





Ailesbury SMART® Hair Transplant is an award-winning multi procedure hair restoration technique that combines PRP stem cell technology, motorised micropunch extraction, anabolic nutrition and LLLT red light phototherapy to shorten the time required for complete hair growth and increase follicular graft survival. It represents a major advance on methods of hair implant technology currently available by concentrating on a shortened recovery time, increased graft survival and reduced risk of complications. 
 STEM CELL TECHNOLOGY 
Ailesbury has been testing the use of platelet – rich plasma (PRP) in hair transplant surgery since 2009 when Carlos Uebel from Brazil and Joseph Greco from Florida  reported improved healing and graft survival with use of this method. Platelets, key players in the body’s wound healing mechanism are activated to release various hair growth factors that stimulate the healing process. These factors stimulate new blood vessels to form (angiogenesis) and collagen to be produced. Cells are stimulated to divide and go into action surrounding the wound. PRP reduces infection and offers a minimally invasive surgical procedure that benefits from a shortened recovery time, increased graft survival and reduced risk of complications. 
 MOTORISED MICROPUNCH EXTRACTION 
The AHI SMART® Hair Implant surgeon uses a small punch(a sort of a special needle) (0,72 mm diameter) with a motorised drill to remove individual follicular units, eliminating the need for excision of skin from the back of the head. Punch gauges can vary. Typical ranges are .75mm to 1.0mm. Small punches are great for minimizing scarring but are not really suitable for larger 2,3 and 4-hair grafts. Using a .75mm punch to extract a triple-hair graft could result in partial or full transection of the graft. Something like a .9mm gauge would be more suited. Respectively, using a larger gauge can preserve yield levels but also create scars larger than desired and damage surrounding follicles. One size does not fit all. 
ANABOLIC AWARE NUTRITION
Hair is made from nutrients in the body, and nutritional deficiencies can cause hair damage and hair loss. For example, biotin deficiencies have been linked to hair loss and skin disorders,and sufficient levels of the B vitamins are necessary for hair health and growth. Many Western diets are lacking in nutrients, and a poor diet may contribute to early onset of hair loss symptoms in people genetically prone to hair loss. Ailesbury Clinic uses Help Hair™ Shake which contains nutrients and herbs specifically selected for their positive effects on hair, including Niacin (vitamin B‐3), Folate, Vitamin B‐12, Biotin, Zinc, Manganese, Fo‐ti Root (Ho Shou Wu or Polygonum multiflorum) ‐ a popular Chinese herb traditionally used to darken pre‐mature gray hair, Kudzo Root ‐ Chinese herb, Pumpkin Seed to help regulate testosterone levels. PABA, Chlorophyll to remove sebum, which carries DHT. As part of an overall hair loss program, Ailesbury Clinics put patients on a low anabolic profile by telling them to consider eliminating or reducing certain supplements in their diet. This includes using the SHAPIRO Chart and montioring the use of anabolic steroids, creatine, Growth Hormone, Androstenedione, HCG diet or Whey Protein Isolate often found in body building additives. 
 RED LIGHT PHOTOTHERAPY 
The technique uses wavelengths with red light therapy in the range of 630 to 670 nanometers (nm) immediately post FUE procedure. Visible red light is capable of being absorbed by the molecules of the hair follicle and can stimulate the growth or re-growth of the hair following a natural biological reaction. Red light is absorbed is because of an intracellular enzyme called cytochrome c, which is responsible for stimulating the hair follicle by sending it certain signals. Those signals promote gene activity and lower apoptosis (cell death regulated by the genes) as well as other reactions. This has been known since 1967 when it was accidentally discovered by a Hungarian scientist who noticed that exposed, shaved mice experience faster hair re-growth. 
 TRANSFER METHOD 
Follicular Transfer is a modern hair restoration technique where hairs are transplanted in groups of 1-4 hairs - exactly as they grow in nature. It is a major advance over the older hair transplantation procedures that used larger grafts and often produced a pluggy, unnatural look. FT technique is actually a two-step procedure. where the aesthetic results mimic the way hair grows in nature and will be undetectable as a hair transplant.  During the first step, also called FUE (Follicullar Unit Extraction), direct extraction of selected individual follicular units from the patient's donor area is performed. allowing the surgeon to control the potential problem of visibly lower donor area density after the procedure. The Second part of the procedure is the Follicular Implantation where the surgeon implants the grafts with a  predetermined density, pattern and angle in a realistic hair pattern. 
Dr. Patrick Treacy is Chairman of the Irish Association of Cosmetic Doctors and is Irish Regional Representative of the British Association of Cosmetic and Honorary Board Member of the World Medical Trichologist Association. Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Royal Society of Arts. (London). Honorary Ambassador to the Michael Jackson Legacy Foundation and the Haiti Leadership Foundation, which opened orphanages in both Haiti and Liberia the past year.
Dr. Treacy holds Honors Degrees in Molecular Biology as well as Medicine. He is the recipient of the Norman Rae Gold medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin. He has also received many national and international academic awards. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 articles in medical and scientific journals and published many peer-reviewed papers within these disciplines, including a sentinel study on the rising incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma for the Mayo Clinic, Rochester in 1990. 
He pioneered facial implant techniques for HIV related facial lipodystrophy and early radiosurgery venous thermocoagulation. He is an advanced aesthetic trainer and has trained over 800 doctors and nurses from around the world.
He is a renowned international guest speaker and features regularly on national television and radio programmes. He has featured on the Today Show, Ireland AM, CNN, Dr. Drew, RTE, TV3, Sky News, BBC and Newsweek.
 Dr Patrick Treacy won the MyFaceMyBook innovation London award in 2013 for the Ailesbury SMART® Hair Transplant technique

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

PRP: Interesting Studies Investigating Platelet Rich Plasma, LLLT - Low Level Laser and Combined Effects

by: BENJAMIN GARRETT

Improving Patient Outcomes and Increasing Practice Revenue: Pain Management, Sports Performance and Surgical Recovery













A recent search on PubMed turned up some very interesting studies regarding PRP - Platelet Rich Plasma and LLLT - Low Level Laser Therapy.  While there are thousands of scientific studies on both PRP and LLLT used individually, it is  finally good to see some studies on the combined effects.