Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Monday, September 19, 2016

Laser treatment for permanent filler complications

Employing an intralesional laser to treat inflammatory complications caused by permanent facial fillers showed a 92% overall improvement rate, according to an Italian study that appeared in the August issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
A total of 218 consecutive patients (204 of whom were women) with a mean age of 49 years were treated with an 808 nm diode laser (LASEmaR 800; Eufoton, Treiste, Italy) between 2006 and 2013.
Patients with infiltrating distribution in the tissues, as in crisscross retrograde injection, were managed by intralesional laser treatment alone. However, patients with cystic distribution in the tissues, as in bolus injections, were treated with both laser-assisted evacuation and drainage through stab wound incisions.
Researchers chose the 810 nm wavelength because of less associated pain than other infrared diodes.
Typically, no anesthesia is required for the laser treatment, according to the study authors, which consists of percutaneously inserting a 200-micron fiberoptic laser directly into the lesions and drilling several small holes. The result is removal of the foreign substance and the inflammatory reaction.  
“A period of up to 6 months is usually necessary to fully appreciate the resolution of the lump together with the healing of the surrounding inflammation often extended far beyond the original implant,” writes lead author Daniel Cassuto, M.D., and his associates from Modena and Milan, Italy.